Examples of Aerobic exercises

Examples of Aerobic exercises include:

brisk walking or hiking

brisk walking or hiking
swimming

swimming

low-impact aerobic exercise classes

low-impact aerobic exercise classes

rowing

rowing
basketball

basketball

cycling

cycling
dancing

dancing

skating

skating

tennis

tennis

jogging

jogging

Tai Chi

Tai Chi

How much aerobic activity is needed?

  • 30 minutes daily of moderate physical aerobic activity
  • at least 5 times weekly

This recommendation is for adults aged 18-64. Adults with diabetes should also aim to meet this target.

Those with a busy schedule may find it helpful to do several shorter workouts totaling 30 minutes daily.

Strength training

Strength training, or resistance training, helps lower blood sugar levels and increases insulin sensitivity.

Examples of strength training include:

lifting free weights

lifting free weights

lifting heavy objects, such as bottles of water or canned food

lifting heavy objects, such as bottles of water or canned food

resistance bands

resistance bands

weight machines

weight machines

exercises that use body weight such as sit-ups, squats, planks, and push-ups

exercises that use body weight such as sit-ups, squats, planks, and push-ups

strength training classes

strength training classes

How much strength training is needed?

Strength training should be undertaken at least twice a week, in addition to the recommended amount of aerobic activity.

Stretching exercises

Stretching exercises are important for everyone, including those with diabetes. Stretching:

  • reduces the risk of injury from aerobic exercises or strength training
  • increases flexibility
  • prevents muscle soreness
  • lowers stress levels
Stretching exercises

How much stretching training is needed?

It can be useful to consider incidental physical activity – everyday activities that aren’t classed as exercise but involve movement.

Types of incidental physical activities include:

taking the stairs instead of the elevator

taking the stairs instead of the elevator

vacuuming

vacuuming

walking to the bus stop

walking to the bus stop

moderate intensity gardening

moderate intensity gardening

walking around the shopping mall

walking around the shopping mall

washing the car

washing the car

Monitoring blood glucose levels when exercising

To exercise safely, many people with diabetes – particularly those with type 1 diabetes or those on diabetes medications – may need to check their blood glucose levels before, during, and after exercise.

This indicates how well the body is responding to exercise, and may help avoid blood sugar fluctuations, which can be dangerous.

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