Asthma

What Is Asthma?

Asthma is a long-term disease of the lungs. You might hear your doctor call it a chronic respiratory disease. It causes your airways to get inflamed and narrow and makes breathing difficult. Severe asthma can make it hard to talk or be active. Some people refer to asthma as “bronchial asthma.”

Risk Factors:

There are usually reasons or risk factors that predispose you to asthma and respiratory problems. Asthma can happen to anyone without any risk factors, but it is less likely if there are no risk factors present.

Let’s look at some asthma risk factors and see how they increase the chance that a person will have the asthma symptoms of coughwheezing, and shortness of breath associated with the disease. After determining your personal risk factors for asthma, decide on the ones you can control and try to make some lifestyle changes. Avoidance of the risk factors you can control is crucial in preventing asthma symptoms. While you cannot change your gender or family history, you can avoid smoking with asthma, breathing polluted air, allergens, and taking care of your general health so you don’t become overweight. Take control of your asthma — by controlling your asthma risk factors. By understanding all the risk factors, you may be able to prevent or control your asthma.

Taking care of yourself can help keep your symptoms under control, including:

  • Get regular exercise. Having asthma doesn’t mean you have to be less active. Treatment can prevent asthma attacks and control symptoms during activity.

Regular exercise can strengthen your heart and lungs, which helps relieve asthma symptoms. If you exercise in cold temperatures, wear a face mask to warm the air you breathe.

  • Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight can worsen asthma symptoms, and it puts you at higher risk of other health problems.
  • Control heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease . It’s possible that the acid reflux that causes heartburn may damage lung airways and worsen asthma symptoms. If you have frequent or constant heartburn, talk to your doctor about treatment options. You may need treatment for GERD before your asthma symptoms improve.
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